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Is Bronchitis Bacterial, Bronchitis, Smoking is 90% of

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Is Bronchitis Bacterial, Bronchitis, Smoking is 90% of

Post by Admin on Sun Jun 05, 2016 6:22 am

Smoking is 90% of the Risk!

Introduction Bronchitis is a respiratory disease in which the mucous membrane in the lungs bronchial passages becomes inflamed and usually occurs in the setting of an upper respiratory illness and is observed more frequently in the winter months. It may be short-lived (acute) or chronic, meaning that it lasts a long time and often recurs and can have causes other than an infection. Bronchitis can also occur when acids from your stomach consistently back up into your food pipe, a condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. Both adults and children can get it. If you are a smoker and come down with the acute form, it will be much harder for you to recover. If you continue smoking, you are increasing your chances of developing the chronic form which is a serious long-term disorder that often requires regular medical treatment. If you suffer from chronic bronchitis, you are at risk for developing cardiovascular problems as well as more serious lung diseases and infections, and you should be monitored by a doctor.

Conclusion Bronchitis is an inflammation of the air passages within the lungs and may be accompanied by signs and symptoms of an upper respiratory infection, including: Soreness and a feeling of constriction or burning in your chest, Sore throat, Congestion, Breathlessness, Wheezing, Slight fever and chills, Overall malaise. Did you ever believe that there was so much to learn about Chronic Bronchitis Asthma? Neither did we! Once we got to write this article, it seemed to be endless.

Treatment Treatment depending on the symptoms and cause, may include: Antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis that appears to be caused by a bacterial infection or for people who have other lung diseases that put them at a greater risk of lung infections, Bronchodilators, which open up the bronchi, may be used on a short-term basis to open airways and reduce wheezing, Cool-mist humidifiers or steam vaporizers can be helpful for wheezing or shortness of breath. Early recognition and treatment, combined with smoking cessation, significantly improve the chance of a good outcome. With severe bronchitis, your fever may be as high as 101' to 102' F and may last for 3 to 5 days even with antibiotic treatment. However, if influenza is the suspected cause, treatment with an antiviral drug may be helpful. We worked as diligently as an owl in producing this composition on Bronchitis Respiratory Disease. So only if you do read it, and appreciate its contents will we feel our efforts haven't gone in vain.

Tobacco and infectious agents are major causes of chronic bronchitis and although found in all age groups, it is diagnosed most frequently in children younger than 5 years. In 1994, it was diagnosed in more than 11 of every 100 children younger than 5 years. Fewer than 5% of people with bronchitis go on to develop pneumonia. Most cases clear up on their own in a few days, especially if you rest, drink plenty of fluids, and keep the air in your home warm and moist. If you have repeated bouts of bronchitis, see your doctor. Go ahead and read this article on Infectious Bronchitis. We would also appreciate it if you could give us an analysis on it for us to make any needed changes to it. Rolling Eyes

Symptoms Symptoms lasting up to 90 days are usually classified as acute; symptoms lasting longer, sometimes for months or years, are usually classified as chronic. Signs of Infectious bronchitis generally begins with the symptoms of a common cold: runny nose, sore throat, fatigue, chills, and back and muscle aches. The signs of either type of bronchitis include: Cough that produces mucus; if yellow-green in color, you are more likely to have a bacterial infection, Shortness of breath made worse by exertion or mild activity, Wheezing, Fatigue, Fever -- usually low and Chest discomfort. Additional symptoms include: Frequent respiratory infections (such as colds or the flu), Ankle, feet, and leg swelling, Blue-tinged lips due to low levels of oxygen. Very Happy.


Risk Over time, harmful substances in tobacco smoke can permanently damage the airways, increasing the risk for emphysema, cancer, and other serious lung diseases. People at risk for acute bronchitis include: The elderly, infants, and young children, Smokers, People with heart or lung disease. Passive smoke exposure is a risk factor for chronic bronchitis and asthma in adults. Smoking (even for a brief time) and being around tobacco smoke, chemical fumes, and other air pollutants for long periods of time puts a person at risk for developing the disease. Overall, tobacco smoking accounts for as much as 90% of the risk. Secondhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke increases the risk of respiratory infections, augments asthma symptoms, and causes a measurable reduction in pulmonary function. Malnutrition increases the risk of upper respiratory tract infections and subsequent acute bronchitis, especially in children and older people.


The fluoroquinolones are a relatively new group of antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones were first introduced in 1986, but they are really modified quinolones, a class of antibiotics, whose accidental discovery occurred in the early 1960.

Third Generation

The third-generation fluoroquinolones are separated into a third class because of their expanded activity against gram-positive organisms, particularly penicillin-sensitive and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and atypical pathogens such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Although the third-generation agents retain broad gram-negative coverage, they are less active than ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas species.

Fourth Generation

The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones add significant antimicrobial activity against anaerobes while maintaining the gram-positive and gram-negative activity of the third-generation drugs. They also retain activity against Pseudomonas species comparable to that of ciprofloxacin. The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones include trovafloxacin (Trovan). We are proud to say we have dominance in the say of Chronic Bronchitis. This is because we have read vastly and extensively on Chronic Bronchitis.

First Generation

The first-generation agents include cinoxacin and nalidixic acid, which are the oldest and least often used quinolones. These drugs had poor systemic distribution and limited activity and were used primarily for gram-negative urinary tract infections. Cinoxacin and nalidixic acid require more frequent dosing than the newer quinolones, and they are more susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance. Embarassed

Classification of Fluoroquinolones

As a group, the fluoroquinolones have excellent in vitro activity against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The newest fluoroquinolones have enhanced activity against gram-positive bacteria with only a minimal decrease in activity against gram-negative bacteria. Their expanded gram-positive activity is especially important because it includes significant activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The development of Chronic Bronchitis has been explained in detail in this article on Chronic Bronchitis. Read it to find something interesting and surprising!

Side Effects

The fluoroquinolones as a class are generally well tolerated. Most adverse effects are mild in severity, self-limited, and rarely result in treatments that one should know. However, they can have serious adverse effects. It may take some time to comprehend the matter on Bronchitis that we have listed here. However, it is only through it's complete comprehension would you get the right picture of Bronchitis.

Because of their expanded antimicrobial spectrum, third-generation fluoroquinolones are useful in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute sinusitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, which are their primary FDA-labeled indications. The third-generation fluoroquinolones include levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin. Producing such an interesting anecdote on Bronchitis took a lot of time and hard work. So it would be enhancing to us to learn that you have made good use of this hard work! Smile

Urinary tract infections (norfloxacin, lomefloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Lower respiratory tract infections (lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Skin and skin-structure infections (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Urethral and cervical gonococcal infections (norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Prostatitis (norfloxacin, ofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Acute sinusitis (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin (Avelox), trovafloxacin) Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Community-acquired pneumonia (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin) We can proudly say that there is no competition to the meaning of Bronchitis, when comparing this article with other articles on Bronchitis found on the net. Rolling Eyes

Conditions treated with Fluoroquinolones: indications and uses The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections. The serum elimination half-life of the fluoroquinolones range from 3 -20 hours, allowing for once or twice daily dosing. We do not mean to show some implication that Bronchitis have to rule the world or something like that. We only mean to let you know the actual meaning of Bronchitis! Surprised.

Because of concern about hepatotoxicity, trovafloxacin therapy should be reserved for life- or limb-threatening infections requiring inpatient treatment (hospital or long-term care facility), and the drug should be taken for no longer than 14 days. The facts on Bronchitis mentioned here have a consequential impact on your understanding on Bronchitis. This is because these facts are the basic and important points about Bronchitis. Very Happy.

The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections. It was our decision to write so much on Bronchitis after finding out that there is still so much to learn on Bronchitis.

Fluoroquinolones Disadvantages:

Tendonitis or tendon rupture Multiple drug interactions Not used in children Newer quinolones produce additional toxicities to the heart that were not found with the older agents The first impression is the best impression. We have written this article on Chronic Bronchitis in such a way that the first impression you get will definitely make you want to read more about it!

Second-generation agents include ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin is the most potent fluoroquinolone against P. aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin are the most widely used second-generation quinolones because of their availability in oral and intravenous formulations and their broad set of FDA-labeled indications. We have included the history of Chronic Bronchitis here so that you will learn more about its history. It is only through it's history can you learn more about Chronic Bronchitis.

The fluoroquinolones are a family of synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with bactericidal activity. The parent of the group is nalidixic acid, discovered in 1962 by Lescher and colleagues. The first fluoroquinolones were widely used because they were the only orally administered agents available for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-negative organisms, including Pseudomonas species. Don't be surprised if you find anything unusual here about Chronic Bronchitis. There has been some interesting and unusual things here worth reading.


Can I Treat Bronchitis At Home If You Have Bronchitis





All of the fluoroquinolones are effective in treating urinary tract infections caused by susceptible organisms. They are the first-line treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis in patients who cannot tolerate sulfonamides or TMP, who live in geographic areas with known resistance > 10% to 20% to TMP-SMX, or who have risk factors for such resistance. Having a penchant for Bronchitis led us to write all that there has been written on Bronchitis here. Hope you too develop a penchant for Bronchitis! Shocked

Second Generation

The second-fast acting bronchodilator albuterol is among the oldest asthma attack treatment drugs gram-negative activity, as well as some gram-positive and atypical pathogen coverage. Compared with first-generation quinolones, these drugs have broader clinical applications in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis, sexually transmitted diseases, selected pneumonias and skin infections.

Fluoroquinolones are approved for use only in people older than 18. They can affect the growth of bones, teeth, and cartilage in a child or fetus. The FDA has assigned fluoroquinolones to pregnancy risk category C, indicating that these drugs have the potential to cause teratogenic or embryocidal effects. Giving fluoroquinolones during pregnancy is not recommended unless the benefits justify the potential risks to the fetus. These agents are also excreted in breast milk and should be avoided during breast-feeding if at all possible. We cannot be blamed if you find any other article resembling the matter we have written here about Chronic Bronchitis. What we have done here is our copyright material!

Fluoroquinolones Advantages:

Ease of administration Daily or twice daily dosing Excellent oral absorption Excellent tissue penetration Prolonged half-lives Significant entry into phagocytic cells Efficacy Overall safety There has been an uncalculatable amount of information added in this a complete guide to symptoms, treatment, and cure of bronchitis. Don't try counting it!

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